978-620-0-07065-4

Gender and EFL Learning in Morocco

Teachers’ and Students’ Perspectives of Gender Roles in EFL Textbooks

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Summary:

The objective of this study is to investigate the ways whereby English language textbooks reinforce gender stereotypes. The main aim is to evaluate Ticket 2 English and to analyze the representations of both women and men in Moroccan EFL textbooks. I would like to investigate the effect of these gender roles represented in this textbook on both girls and boys. This study would prove that EFL textbooks reinforce gender stereotypes through the presentation of implicit meanings in words, pictures, adjectives and the social functions of both females and males. However, this investigation might find a possibility of making a change within the student’s mindset relying on the presentation of equality and equity in textbooks and attitudes of teachers towards gender. The present research aims at investigating the effects of gender representation in Moroccan EFL textbooks mainly Ticket 2 English on second baccalaureate learners' perception of women and men’s identity. It studies the impacts of gender roles that are reflected in EFL textbooks.

Author:

Hmad Benaissa

Biographie:

BENAISSA a teacher of English. He is a holder of a Master in English studies particularly in Women and Gender Studies from Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University -Dher Mehraze Fes. He has a BA in English Studies option Cultural Studies from the same university. He has also an LPQ; Professional Degree: Science of Education.

Number of Pages:

92

Book language:

English

Published On:

2019-09-16

ISBN:

978-620-0-07065-4

Publishing House:

Noor Publishing

Keywords:

Gender studies, Women Studies, Gender and Language, Gender and EFL learning, Gender and textbooks, stereotypes, Performativity, Moroccan women, men, women, language, Language and Identity, identity

Product category:

SOCIAL SCIENCE / Gender Studies